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Nutritional Counseling is a Key Parental Resource Edmonds WA

Children have different nutritional needs than adults. Toddlers need approximately 37-41 calories per pound of body weight; their needs vary significantly over time, based on growth and physical activity. By adulthood, average needs are 14-16 calories per pound, depending on activity level. Calories from carbohydrates should be derived mostly from whole grains, not processed grain (most notably bread and pasta), and fruits and vegetables.

Paul Bryan Edmonds, MD
(405) 733-4985
21616 76th Avenue West South
Edmonds, WA
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1961
Hospital
Hospital: Midwest City Regional Hospital, Midwest City, Ok
Group Practice: Renaissance Physicians

Data Provided by:
One World Nutrtional Services Inc.
(425) 985-1434
19628 Bing Rd
Lynnwood, WA
 
Deanna Minich
(360) 731-7705
Call For Address
Seattle, WA
Company
DEANNA MINICH, CN
Industry
Nutritionist

Data Provided by:
Eliza Carlson
(206) 860-9090
2033 10th Ave E
Seattle, WA
Company
The Vital Energy Center
Industry
Nutritionist
Specialties & Therapies
Specialties : Obesity

Therapies : Nutritional Counseling, Natural Health
Insurance
Regence
Professional Affiliations
American Dietetic Association

Data Provided by:
Ami Karnosh
(206) 683-5083
8266 Lake City Way, Ste C3
Seattle, WA
Company
KARMA NUTRITION
Industry
Nutritionist

Data Provided by:
One World Nutrtional Services Inc.
(425) 985-1434
19628 Bing Rd
Lynnwood, WA
 
Sharon Gray
(206) 234-2603
14855 Ashworth Ave N.
Shoreline, WA
Company
Private Office
Industry
Nutritionist, Acupuncturist
Specialties & Therapies
Specialties : Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Indigestion, Chronic Fatigue, Anxiety, Women's Health

Therapies : Whole Foods Cooking, Qi Gong, Acupuncture, Acupressure
Insurance
Receipt provided for reimbursement
Professional Affiliations
National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, Brenneke School of Massage, Bastyr University

Data Provided by:
Selena Eon
(425) 780-7019
PO Box 422
Bothell, WA
Company
Selena Eon, ND
Industry
Naturopath, Naturopathic Doctor (ND), Nutritionist
Specialties & Therapies
Specialties : Autism, Back Pain, Food Allergies, Migraine, Pain

Therapies : Herbal Medicine, Holistic Medicine, Neuro Cranial Reconstruction, Whole Foods Cooking
Insurance
None

Data Provided by:
Tim Knight
(425) 398-9355
12900 NE 180 th Street, Suite 100
Bothell, WA
Company
Balancing Health
Industry
Acupuncturist, Nutritionist

Data Provided by:
Aimee Gallo
(206) 227-1231
819 N. 49th St.
Seattle, WA
Company
VIBRANCE Nutrition and Fitness
Industry
Nutritionist, Personal Trainer
Specialties & Therapies
Specialties : Fatigue, Gastrointestinal Concerns, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Weight Loss, Women's Health

Therapies : Nutritional Counseling, Sports Performance Consulting, Whole Foods Cooking
Professional Affiliations
Bastyr University, Institute for Integrative Nutrition

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Nutritional Counseling is a Key Parental Resource

Provided By: 

Health and Fitness

Nutritional Counseling is Key Parental Resource
By Larry Kenigsberg 
Email Email
Jan 6, 2008, 09:05
   

Parents want to make sure their children are healthy. Instilling good eating and exercise habits is critical to that process.

Despite this, more than 17 percent of children between two and 19 are overweight, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Lori Brizee, MS, RD, LD, CSP, of the BitWine Nutrition Advisors' Network
(www.nutrition.bitwine.com) is a nutritionist who works with parents to ensure that their over- and underweight children reach and maintain a healthy weight.

Parents of overweight children should not put their children on diets.
"Singling out overweight children will only discourage them and make them feel stigmatized, punished, and deprived," Lori says. "Rather, it is important to establish healthy eating habits and regular exercise as a lifestyle for everyone."

Children have different nutritional needs than adults. Toddlers need approximately 37-41 calories per pound of body weight; their needs vary significantly over time, based on growth and physical activity. By adulthood, average needs are 14-16 calories per pound, depending on activity level.

"Children need a higher percentage of calories to come from fat until they are two years old," Lori continues. "We know that the risk for heart disease begins in early childhood, so after the age of two, recommendations are for fat intake to decrease to about 30% of total calories, unless a child is not gaining weight well. Children growing well can be transitioned from whole milk or breast milk to non-fat or 1% fat milk. Children who are underweight should continue to have whole milk and have other heart-healthy fats such as canola oil or olive oil added to foods to increase caloric intake."

Protein needs in young children are not particularly high - .50g/lb age one and .43g/lb by age 4. "If kids are meeting their needs for other nutrients, especially iron and calcium, they are meeting their protein needs, as foods high in these two nutrients are high in protein - any type of dark meat or fish is a great source of iron (e.g., beef, dark meat of chicken, pork, tuna, salmon), and dairy products and many soy products are excellent sources of calcium."

Calories from carbohydrates should be derived mostly from whole grains, not processed grain (most notably bread and pasta), and fruits and vegetables.

Lori does caution against giving children under two years of age or who are not growing well a very high-fiber diet without adequate fat, as lots of high-fiber, low-calorie foods can fill young children without giving them adequate calories.

Increasing physical activity is just as critical as instilling good eating habits. "Families should become more active together," Lori stresses.
"Active parents help children be more physically healthy by modeling positive behaviors. Turn off the TV ...

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